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is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
-- scare people, but what you should do in this environment is don't get distracted from there, don't go for fear. >> ross, if what you're saying suggests, perhaps, gold still is a safe haven, why do you think so? >> let me qualify that. it's an imperfect safe haven. it's an imperfect safe haven, particularly in the short run. >> against what? >> against financial meltdown or inflation or politicians not doing what they should do, in that case. so it's an insurance plan, if you like. >> is the reason we have this down move is because people are now -- is the gold pricing in the fact we're not going to get more qe out of -- >> it may be. and it's part of the story dwr the shorts have hit gold is not because of what has happened, but because of what hasn't happened. we haven't had hyper inflation. we didn't have the euro collapse. certain things didn't happen. i think that would have aggravated the gold market. fundamentally, it still remains in the short-term a long haven and imperfect. >> if nvs the kind of move, you know, that indicated that if gold were going to respond to more quantit
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
and the potential for further government spending cuts and the regulatory environment. >>> and listen up, everybody.it looks like fed chairman ben bernanke, he's going to to the annual jackson hole symposium this week. it may not sound like a big deal, but this is the first time he's marked that event since 2006. reuters quote the spokes woman who says bernanke is not planning on attending because of a personal scheduling conarthritic. they've used this forum to try ask preview important fed actions. just about every big move they've made along the way he has made public at jackson hole. people have been wondering if he was going to talk about a potential successor this time around. >> can i give you a conspiracy theory? if this is -- this is like your place. if you run the fed, you go to this thing, right? and if this was going to be the last time you could go as the fed chairman, if you thought that he was going to be stepping down next fall or next spring, rather, you probably would find a way to show up. >> actually, i look ate more as him having not made up his mind yet. if you haven't decide
advertisers into an environment with twitter to really understand the social tv space. melissa: what does that mean in english for people that do not understand advertising? >> went to third audience are sitting next to their smart phone and tablet and watching tv. there are conversations happening. their customers include coca-cola, procter and gamble, all of the big names that are out there. they will be able to go on twitter and mine what consumers are talking about. what shows they are watching. it seems like you can collect data. it is endless. >> absolutely. how do we mind these opportunities whether it is direct to understand the conversation. we can make sure that our brands are more fully embedded and engaging. melissa: i am an avid twitter user. it is easy, clean, straightforward. there is not a lot of clutter. what is an add on twitter going to look like and will it ruin the experience? >> i think it will look very different tomorrow than it does today. you want to create advertising that is even more relevant. you wanted to be more engaging. melissa: it is not the difference b
in a diversionary environment? >> obviously the world is very dynamic. we have the report from china that their growth was not as robust as expected. economic act two that he is not quite as robust to support this type of equity market. there are concerns that confidence is fading on the u.s. federal reserve monetary policy as well. >> i think that is part of it. i think what you observe in a marketplace is at the asian market is still very interested in gold. they are very active in this cold environment. earlier this year, the indians were a little bit challenged. this clearly opened up the window for them. lori: let's talk about some of these gold mining stocks. a lot of people were concerned about the gold mining companies. getting back to your discussion with me on production costs versus -- do you think they are on a more bullish trajectory? >> i think we are getting a realignment that is a positive for the industry. lori: would you put new money into shares? >> not a position for us. lori: i appreciate your take. thank you. melissa: will the deadly boston terror attack change
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
things in the environment and i will pound mail that goes to official facilities like capitol hill or white house. this person must have known that this mail could be intercepted but that doesn't absolve of the clumsy murder attempt. he did everything but put his address and fingerprints on envelope. the real risk is not necessarily organized plot or someone trying to perpetrate a terrorist the act but a lone mad scientist with diabolical intent with a apocalyptic vision who has the means to reengineer a virus or a bug. jenna: when we get that scenario, it brings us to the movies. what is the worst case scenario? when people ask you that what do you think is the case scenario when it comes to this substance? >> worst-case scenario, someone who is smart and ph.d scientist and knows how to work on genetic materials like the movie 12 monkeys. jenna: we're into speculation but not necessarily ricin or anthrax or something we know of? >> ricin is not a very potent killer. it is used in the past for targeted as nations but none on the list of 12 compounds the government says is major thr
money printing. in those environments, gold does very well. you have the goldman sachs downgrade. you have people picking sides. then you have the slowing chinese debt. i think that really hits the market all at once. that led to margins being that and they continue to tumble downwards. dagen: talk about the difference you are seeing in behavior. are you seeing any selling among those physical gold owners? >> not as dramatic of a difference. we are a precious metals platform. on friday and monday, we had four to five times as many body and sell orders. we have done our own research. i think that plays into my point. it is somewhat reminiscent to what happened to apple. in the paper market, you have a dramatic selloff. in the physical market, the demand is very, very strong. connell: let's follow up on that. let's talk about apple. the big game for the dollar versus the euro. is that part of the case you make for gold? >> i think part of the reason is for safety. in times like this, i think now is a fantastic entry point. it is certainly better than two weeks ago. it is uncorrelated. t
anything else becoming empowered to look into your environment and what we're seeing from boston, heroes is comi
? >> the average person? >> yes, absolutely. you can. >> what? >> when you go into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if the blast is from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass and severely injure or possible kill. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life
concerned many of the new investments in the current congressional environment strike me as a very heavy lift. i have questions about the proposal to allow cbt to accept money from outside stakeholders. in particular, i would like to know how this proposal relates to plans for the uae. i am concerned that the department has yet again proposed to consolidate 16 targeted homeland security grant pot.ams into a single it has been years since consolidation was proposed and they have not articulated the existing grant programs and how they will be maintained. , we limited resources ensure that they are adequately funded. has two major, it initiatives. the immigratre ahe cycurity. -- youources that unique anticipated advances. >> opening statements may be submitted for the record. i would like to introduce the secretary. she is beginning her fifth year of service said one of the most important cabinet positions of the government. is asary napolitan siro governor and attorney general for the state of arizona. and she was also of the united states attorney. record,appear in the and i now recogniz
for two senators to reach a deal. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between the two of them something that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it wll pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and punishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interestingost people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunity to go to break very qu
. the whole idea of the urban environment derailed, but the plans put forward for the park and for the national park. the same state and federal officials of the philadelphians are dealing with for the u.n. proposal were the ones who also were going to sign off on the part. this interesting connections there certainly. >> charlene, just being aware of time is here, but to continue the dialogue. i'd like to thank her again for her presentation. [applause] >> where the conservative book local action conference in washington d.c. with author paul kengor of "the communist." who was frank marshall davis? >> frank marshall davis was born in kansas 1905, died and made you and 87. ended up in chicago and ultimately honolulu and that's where he would meet a young man named barack obama in the 70s. he was introduced by obama's grandfather, stanley dunham. i should back up a little bit. he was african-american. he was a republican from the time of lincoln to fdr. remarkably what so far to the left that during world war ii he joined the communist party. he joined communist party u.s.a.
from criticism that it ignored the threat he environment in benghazi. we're back with the panel. it goes on kirsten. >> what difference does it makes a secretary clinton would say democrats are claiming political hit job by the republicans and frequently these things do get politicized but i would say the democrats were welcomed to be part of this, i'm sure and nobody is stopping them from investigating benghazi and they embarrassed themselves during the hearings, spending the whomentd time trying to make up stories for why the administration dropped the ball on this. so, one of the most interesting things in this is that secretary clinton, when she was testifying, said that she was not aware that nothing came to her attention in terms of security for the embassy and, in fact, it turns out that it did. and her exact words were i made it very clear the security cables did not come to my attention or above the assistant secretary level. well it did go above the assistant secretary level. it wally actually went to her office. weather she saw it or not is a different question it def
environment. jetblue, united, southwest all up as well today. sue? >>> ty, this is the financial equivalent of the super bowl of quarterly reports. apple releasing numbers after the bell today, the stock, which has taken a beating recently now traiting above $400. not by much, but they'll take it. investors may be coming back, but what do consumers this i? that story next when pow per continues. [ female announcer ] it's time for the annual shareholders meeting. ♪ there'll be the usual presentations on research. and development. some new members of the team will be introduced. the chairman emeritus will distribute his usual wisdom. and you? well, you're the chief life officer. you just need the right professional to help you take charge. ♪ >>> all right. the market's kind of fallen apart. it's whipsawed all the way back up. so take a look at the right-hand side. we saw the dow jones industrial average go from a garch of 135 points to negative 12 in under a minute and a half. this is all sorts of rumors, and we'll follow those up. the market has bounced way back up again, but the volume
in a challenging economic environment. the question for all of us is how long willho that last that e consumers held up relatively well. i think we alsoly see that in spending and the credit risk -- or formants which have substantially come down verall, they're at close to historical lows. we're performing a50% better than the major bank card issuers. so i think that that demonstrates some view that the consumer health is pretty decent. consumer confidence held up pretty well. but, frankly, david, i've really been of the view not surprisingly that the economic recovery as i look at in the broad scale is going to be relatively slow. i don't have a great deal of confidence that there's going to be any turnaround in the near term. and i think what we've got to hope for is that it >> over the last, certainly over the last four years of this administration part of a long-term trend as i've outlined in the book is using more and more state power to impose a particular worldview called liberalism and i will go into a definition of that so we are not using terms loosely but as a christian i am worried
slices so everybody can eat. you need to get more pizza. in order to do that you need an environment good for business. and i think they have all lost sight of that. it's not about taxes, redistribution. >> are you looking for a quick fix? >> there's no quick fix to this. there's a very difficult fix to this and things if both sides will have to do that are uncomfortable in the short run. lying about it isn't going to make it better. by saying social security, medicare, medicaid aren't in trouble, is not going to make it better. >> working so well. >> despicable. >> bob, thank you for coming in today. >> thank you. >> j.j., rick, see you soon. thank you. >> always a pleasure. >> our guest host will be with us the rest of the show. >> very excited this morning. >> tell us what you really think. coming up, more on goldman sack's earnings report. beating the streets expectations by 40%. up next, reaction from financial sector analysts. the one and only dick bove. ♪ ♪ the new blackberry z10 with time shift and blackberry balance. built to keep you moving. see it in action at blackberry.co
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
for a few hours and to institute special targeting rules both in the air environment and at the canadian border environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. with respect to fema, i can, when saw the response in boston and a coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november, boston held a massive exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event. and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercise is supported by the committee through fema to local areas, and again increasing our ability for response and resilience. we have worked with the fbi and ietotate lct ross e critical infrarurs d oprators, and we've been reaching out to faith-based organizations, community organizations and others who want to know what they can do. we are implementing a number of security measures, both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs within the maritime environment, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is provided security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing searches on terms of ground transporta
to this environment. >> clayton: would you need to show that the suspect was abouting on behalf of foreign power or in capacity as a military combatant to try him in a military trial? >> that is correct or treat him, put him in military system. we have don't have all the facts but the arguement is this. his older brother was inducted in al-qaeda affiliateddentity while he was being trained in russia. he came back and inducted his own brother. not all the facts on the table but what is troubling to me and senator whose statement you read is the administration is utterly uninterested in exploring this. they want the option off the table. instead of waiting for days or a couple of weeks until all the facts are in. i will be the first one to say if the facts don't support the classification as enemy combatant we should not do that, but we should not rush the process to give benefit of treating it as enemy combatant. >> clayton: what stood out to me the president's comments we're safe. we got him there. seemed to be a sense of wait a second, do we know all of the details yet? do we know the connectio
to bring a little kin to the environment. here's some of what you said. r.d. copeland tweeted us, i build raw bale and ear plasr homes. can you explain what that means? >> he's got two brothers. >> i was thinking the same thing. >> we applaud him for what he's doing. >> i bet it smells goodtoo. >> another one. lindsay says her forite way to save the planet,sing cloth apers an wipes. >> i heard about that when i had my daughter. >> and then what happened? >> i think i tried it for, like, two days. >> you have to watch them. i thought the smell, and the sink is full of you know what. >> why do you hate the environment? >> willie! >> giada knows being green is a ar round deal. she's been working with ks in an elementary school in l.a. to plant a gardennd grow their own food. >> that's terrific. >> how did this come about? >> what i did in partnership with my agency is that we adopted the school i compton, californ. it's foster elementa, and there's a lot of actual kids who are foster kids in the school. what i really wanted to do tru was just allow them to have a pleasant, fun, educational e
with our reduced output so the faith is still there, that it's well run in a bad macro economic environment which comes back to mcdonald's which you have a note out today from sus can dehanna which says it is executing across the world and it is stable in its market share or gaining and it is against it. that seems to be the major theme. >> another theme that's sort of emerged in these big companies, citigroup, as well is the strength of the latin american consumer and the latin american corporation. caterpillar noting that lshg, even though china continues to be weak and there seems to be a shift from asia pacific to latin america coming from these multinationals. >> resuming the buyback does not hurt by the end of the year. it had approved for a while in '07. >> and that might be taking some of the sting out of this today. >> when we come back, yet another price target cut for apple ahead of its earnings and this time from bmo. colin gilles over at bgc is upgrading the stock this morning. which one is right? we'll hear from both analysts this morning. the dow coming off its worst week sin
universal all week long for our green week coverage from the politics of the environment, to the ways we can all work together to help go green. >>> coming up, authorities foil another terrorist plot, this one targeting passenger trains. >>> plus the road to redemption. congressman todd aiken trying to make a political comeback or just a statement? why he's just one in a long line of long shots trying for a second, or in some cases third act. >>> when was the last time a south carolina democrat won a u.s. house seat previously held by a republican? first person to tweet the answer gets the shout-out. the answer including more on the keystone pipeline after "the daily rundown." ♪ i've got the power people lose 5x more weight following the weight watchers approach than trying on their own. you can too. the new weight watchers 360 program. join for free and check out the new risk free guarantee today. because it works. and check out the new risk free guarantee today. geico and we could help youo save on boat and motorcycle insurance too. other insurance companies are green with envy. oh, no,
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
's something that would have to be part of an agreement and acceptable to republicans in this environment, it is something we can defend on a technical basis. it's more accurate and because for middle class people, you know, it's a burden that is relatively small. the most vulnerable even $10 a month for the most vulnerable is a big deal. if you live to be 90 years old and all you have is the social security, that $10 can be the difference between food in the last couple of days of the month. so i think we have to distinguish between what impact going a more correct measure would have. and we have, you know, put in a way that we think is fair. by saying that the most vulnerable have the benefit go up. not because we have the overall adjustment being faster. we will make the decision to go in and make sure they're not hurt. >> thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for appearing. i have four sets of questions i'm going run through quickly. supplementally. first thing has to do with the crap i look at the budget. how it's crurkted. because the choice of the underpinnings of the a
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
had -- they may not have had ieds but certainly have had high stress environments that kind of mimic a conflict. i'm thinking here about parts of the inner city or what is known as the inner city, cities like -- places like compton detroit, chicago a couple of years has been off the charts, parts of d.c. back in the '80s, parts of new york. so i mean -- i think there are high stress environments that mimic conflict zones. however, again i think this was different because this was -- we ignore what happens within our inner cities, within our urban centers and then in a way we ignore what happens in other people's cities and other people's foreign centers where we are active. and i think this was one moment that was broadcast all over -- all across the nation. it was all across the world. people were watching. all of a sudden, middle class americans, people who live in places like watertown they get a taste of what other countries -- what other people, what other parts of their own country have to go through. i don't think that it's crazy to -- the vocabulary that was used was the same
environment even more. i think you have a great, virtuous cycle that's kicking in. >> that cuts to the fundamental question about netflix whether it's growing fast enough to pay for the international expansion and to pay for the content bills that it's rack up. >> if you look in detail at these figures who which you have to still, the loss overseas is $77 million and the negative free cash flow is 42 million, tony. >> there are a couple of things that have gone on in this quarter. one, we do see these improvements in the use of accounts payable which in the cash flow and the u.s. streaming business scale better which should provide more cash flow and the dvd business is not declining as fast and these guys are managing the business pretty well. if i can on the international, it's down, but not down as much assy we expected and the way to think about that is maybe these international markets are getting to profitability sooner than expected and it may not be as big of a drag as people thought going in. they're focusing on traditional valuation in the near-term. i think what the s
political environments. another approach, one that we favor, is to lay out a better and clearer conservative vision of american society. the role of government, unlimited opportunity, of political self-government. rather than new principles, what we need are better arguments. and when you take those arguments -- we need to take those arguments to the american people. it is in that spirit that we welcome today's speaker to heritageouat mike lee is in th third year of his first term. that means more terms to follow. the first -- the third year of his first term as united states senator from the state of utah. his background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as
's a federal group that that is their job is to go out and do search and rescue in these types of environments as we had last night. they are also assisted by the fire department heavy rescue. in the ford hood search and rescue group. i would assume there are probably others i don't have names to and i don't mean to leave anybody out. but, again, limited information coming from them because they have higher priorities in saving lives than passing information along to me. i can tell you that some of the areas they are searching, they are having to shore up before they are allowed to go into those homes. one of those is an apartment complex. when i use the term shore up, it means they are using heavy rescue, the search and rescue groups. the task force teams to actually reinforce some of the structures before they can safety enter that. once they get a structure secure , then and only then are they being allowed to go in and search. it is tedious and time consuming. it is mythodical process. rescue and save lives. the number two priority is to make sure there are no further injuries and nobody e
but not faulty aggression. he has to be able to work in different environments and have the drive. >> they look like german shepherds but they're not, correct? >> correct. this is a belgian. they're very similar. dutch shepherd german shepherd and this one. >> i remember the raids carried out on osama bin laden's compound that we learned about a mall inroy. his name was cairo, is that correct? >> that's correct. >> that's the first time i got the sense that wow, these are dogs with elite units. >> absolutely it's something that has. been -- >> what do they do? why is it so critical to have a dog? >> the primary thing for them is bomb detection. to have the ability for a dog to be able to move out in front is priceless. >> and i kept -- when did this start happening? did somebody say let's bring a dog and somebody said that's not a good idea or did somebody say, that is a good idea? >> dogs have been used since man existed but special operations started using them in vietnam and then after that the programs were largely disbanded and after 9/11 it was decided s
is that they see the light. the leaves of the iris are constantly monitoring light environment. they're actually may sewering how long the night is. >> reporter: it has nothing to do with summer. it is all about recognizing... >> the length of the day and the length of the night. >> reporter: this blooming iris was captured in time lapse video by film maker lewis swarsberg. the images show case the wonder of these plants. which can detect and respond to light even color. >> just like we can see red, blue and green, plants can see red, blue and even u.v. light. >> reporter: in some ways plants have a greater spectrum of light. >> they see more than we do. from a plant's point of view we're visually challenged. we only have four or five photo receptors, proteins that can see the light in our bodies. plants have like 13. >> they don't have sense organs in the way that we do. they don't have eyes or ears or noses, but they have receptors. and that's the level at which humans and plants are the same. >> reporter: amy litt is the director of plant-gemomics at the botanical garden. she explains that so
this is not an environment in which to address this. there are serious allegations of what they knew and did not know, and we'll have the benefit of hindsight. we are all monday morning quarterbacks on this, but because of his and issue intricately woven into legislation, we ought to let the dust settle, the emotions calm down before we address it. ashley: when you look at the root they took, everything was done legally. they went through the process, the younger brother became a citizen on 9/11 last year, the older brother held a green card, they filled out all the forms. what did the fbi now reportedly, allegedly i should say, knew they were tipped off the older brother, there was concerned about him. from an immigration point of view, some say they got through the cracks. tracy: fbi does not monitor immigrants. the fbi would only get involved with immigrant if there is credible allegation of criminal activity. it did not rise to the level of prosecution of credibility. they can only go forward with and do something with evidence when there is enough evidence to move forward with it did not exist at the ti
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
. >> thanks, al. >>> up next, makeup that's good for you and the environment, right after this. hi, listen i think you could do better. oh no, he's a nice guy. no i'm talking abt your yogurt. see dannon oikos is so rich and thick and smooth. so smooth. in a national taste test dannon oikos fat free rawber flavor beat chobani 2 to 1. mmmm. stamos? look babe - i'm doing better. she means the yogurt. join us babe. try it for yrself. dannon oikos greek nonfat yogurt. ♪ dannon it'not a ndy bar. 130 calories 7 grams of protein the new fiber one caramel nut protein bar. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check th temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. or lasts longer. igarnier invents olia. a haircolor breakthrough. our first monia-ee permanent color, pored by oil. olia propepe color deep. pure, luminous, vivid color. visibly improves and restores hair. new olia by garnier. i'm over the hill. my bod'k the way it used to. past my prime? i'm a victim o
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
and my being chair of the democratic party and protection of the environment, civil rights women's rights, gay rights economic justice, social justice, central america, anti-quandra, you name it. casey kason was there. i marched alongside of him in so many rallies, i can't tell you. he was a wonderful, wonderful guy. he is best known for top 40. once in a while, he moot lose his temper as he did when he was once asked to give a dedication to a little boy who lost -- whose dog had died and then he had to suddenly go from that into some up-beat song, and casey wasn't happy with what his producers had done to him. here he is. >> dear casey, this may seem to be a strange dedication request, but i am quite sincere, and it will mean a lot if you play it. recently, there was a death in our family. he was a little dog named snuggles but he was most certainly -- going to start again. i am coming out of the record. play the record please. >> not happy when you come out of those up-tempo numbers, it's impossible to make those transactions and go into somebody
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
and debris, the kind of things that could have been picked up from the environment when the woman went off, jenna. jenna: mike, no arrests yet and we're seeing video from the scene that day, how is security in the city of boston? >> reporter: we are really seeing an increase in security. just behind me there is a armored vehicle parked in front of massachusetts general hospital. we see an increase in the yellowjackets of city police officers who are out there. state troopers increased their numbers in the city of boston by 100 to augment the city police there. they're deployed at every hospital. they're deployed at the statehouse and they're deployed at the metro boston transit authority stops. additional troopers have been sent to the airport, jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. mike, thank you. jon: we are also following some breaking developments out of capitol hill after a letter sent to the office of senator roger wicker tests positive for the potentially fatal substance ricin. peter doocy is live outside the senate mail facility in hyattsville, maryland where the letter was inte
environment where anchors are filling, but you are right -- >> but they are really not that fast breaking. they are in the moment, but we don't have a lot of information. if you think about it if they had only reported what news they had, it would have had about three minutes of information, and then they could have said come back later, we'll tell you what else we got. but instead there was a bombing, we have surveillance video, the cops are doing xyandz and now we're going to talk about what people think could happen or what type of bombing should be. >> stephanie: yeah, is anybody saying the texas thing -- >> nobody is saying that yet. they are saying it was probably an accident. >> there's video now. i mean if you think about -- the reason the fertilizer plant thing is such a big deal if you think about how much fertilizer mcveigh used it was inside of a truck, and the damage it caused. you are talking about an entire plant of fertilizer and if you look at the one video i have seen of the explosion, it was ginormous. >> five blocks surrounding the plant have been c
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